//Trail Status mouse over Java // Yielding

Author Topic: Yielding  (Read 3050 times)

Paul_Arlinghaus

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Yielding
« on: September 21, 2011, 09:35:28 PM »
I typically look at trails through the eyes of a mountain biker.  Since I am unable to ride, I ran at Town Run tonight.  I thought it might be interesting to think about what it would be like to run the trails as if I am not a mountain biker.  Since the IMBA trail rules requires mountain bikers to yield, in stead of looking ahead for mountain bikers and stepping off the trail, I just kept running.

As I encountered riders I paid attention to how they reacted.  In too many cases tonight mountain bikers did not do a good job of yielding.  Many riders continued to pedal as they approached with out slowing down at all, only to lean to one side of the trial as they passed me.  In several cases a group of riders approached and the lead riders did a poor job of leading their group. 

In the past, I have thought, no big deal, Town Run is mostly mountain bikers.  But what happens when riders from Town Run ride at other parks.  Do they take their bad habits with them? 

I have already heard complaint form riders and Park staff at Fort Harrison State Park.  Several riders ignored trail closed to mtb signs and no authorize access signs and ended up on the horse trails.  Several riders have commented on riders aggressively passing them on the trail.  And one hiker has complained about bikes going too fast.

I can not express enough, how important it is that we set a high bar for how we as a user group interact with other trails users and even with in our user group.  Several high level Park staff have commented on how important it is that mountain bikers get along with other trail users at Fort Harrison.  We also encourage many high level DNR staff to hike our trails.  That hiker could be some one who directly effects the access we have to build trails.

So here are some guidelines for how to yield appropriately.

SLOW DOWN:  when ever you pass another trail user (hiker, trail runner, or mountain biker) slow down.  The biggest thing I noticed tonight was whether riders pedaled at me or stopped pedaling. When you are on foot, and you see a cyclist pedaling towards you, the message is "get out of my way or I'm going to run you over".  Even if the runner or slower rider pulls of the trail for you, do not pass them at full speed.  Make sure they know you would have stopped for them.

BE PREPARED TO STOP:  Many trails are narrow.  Do not assume that you can squeeze by.  If in doubt, stop.

COMMUNICATE:  If you see someone coming towards you, speak up.  Call out "hiker up", so the riders behind you know they need to slow down.   When you pass someone, say something nice. 

BE A GOOD GROUP LEADER:  If you are riding in a group, the lead rider bears greater responsibility. You must be on the look out for approaching hikers/riders.  When you see someone, you must call out to your group to let them know to slow down.  Sit up and put out a hand to signal to slow down, if you can.  When you pass some one, you must ensure you get the whole group past them safely.  Also, communicate to the person you are passing. Let them know how many people are in your group. 

SPEAK UP:  All mountain bikers reflect on the user group. It only takes a few bad apples to ruin things for us.  If you see, or know someone who is riding too aggressively, speak up and let them know what is expected of mountain bikers.
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Doe

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Re: Yielding
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2011, 09:51:12 PM »
I was riding Schoen Creek last Friday afternoon and a jogger and I came face to face suddenly...I stopped and said, "sorry," and he said, "You have the right of way!"  I said, "No, you do!"

Rcook

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Re: Yielding
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2011, 06:45:31 AM »
Paul...If people dont play by the rules at Town Run believe me a change of venue will not change the way they act speaking from experience as a New mountain biker I have met some extremely friendly fellow MTBers but have also met many on the trail that think they are in a constant race and that you are in there way or infringing on there territory... The good usually out ways the bad but that is a fact of any society..I applaud all the good you do and for those that are in such a big hurry stop take a drink and enjoy nature..Peace
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David Kuehnen

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Re: Yielding
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2011, 09:44:24 AM »
Don't be shy about calling out another rider for not following the rules.  Remember, every bad experience between a hiker/runner and a mountain bike is another nail in the coffin for Mountain Biking at Fort Ben.    If you experience another rider acting like a jerk, politely inform them that there are rules about yielding and being in control of their bike at all time.    Also, tell them to check out this website.   I personally have no problem with yelling at someone for acting a fool.  Hell, I have been known to confront people in the parking lot and lecture them about basic trail etiquette such as calling out a pass and not riding my rear tire.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2011, 01:05:34 PM by Dave Kuehnen »
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MWilliams

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Re: Yielding
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2011, 11:30:23 AM »
I was riding Schoen Creek last Friday afternoon and a jogger and I came face to face suddenly...I stopped and said, "sorry," and he said, "You have the right of way!"  I said, "No, you do!"

Been there a few times myself.   90% of the time the hikers & joggers are already off the track yielding before I'm even close enough to make a stop or communicate and always waving me through. 

 In the remaining 10% instances its almost been like a mexican standoff.   I'll stop, they stop,  I'll say "c'mon through, and they say "no, that's alright, c'mon through", and I'll say, " that's alright, I need to take a little breather anyways, and besides you have the right of way" and yes, they're usually are surprised to realize that they do have the right a way.  Some of them have even expressed how they thought it was somewhat ridiculous. 

« Last Edit: September 22, 2011, 12:49:04 PM by MWilliams »
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Jeff Blum

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Re: Yielding
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2011, 12:34:24 PM »
they're usually are surprised to realize that they do have the right a way.  Some of them have even expressed how they thought it was somewhat ridiculous.

That's when you say "On our trails, we follow our rules.  Now run, Forrest. Run!"

That's a joke, btw!

Paul_Arlinghaus

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Re: Yielding
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2011, 12:50:57 PM »
I was riding Schoen Creek last Friday afternoon and a jogger and I came face to face suddenly...I stopped and said, "sorry," and he said, "You have the right of way!"  I said, "No, you do!"

Been there a few times myself.   90% of the time the hikers & joggers are already off the track yielding before I'm even close enough to make a stop or communicate and always waving me through. 

 In some of those 10% instances its almost been like a mexican standoff.   I'll stop, they stop,  I'll say "c'mon through, and they say "no, that's alright, c'mon through", and I'll say, " that's alright, I need to take a little breather anyways, and besides you have the right of way" and yes, they're usually are surprised to realize that they do have the right a way.  Some of them have even expressed how they thought it was somewhat ridiculous.

If you are coming towards a hiker, and they step off the trail for you, you don't need to stop.  Slow down and thank them and ride right through.  Just know that if they were unable to step off the trail, that you would need to stop.  Once everyone is stopped, there is no requirement for the biker to stay stopped while the hiker goes by.  Its up to both people to work together to get by. 

I think that at town run, most runners and hikers understand they are going to encounter a lot of bikes, so they watch for them and step off ahead of time.  The same with respect to riders going up hill at BCSP.  Many riders going up hill will pull over as a courtousy (and manybe to catch a breather) to allow the down hill rider to enjoy the down hill.  But  too often, I think riders get used to people on foot or the uphill riders pulling over and they start to expect it. 

As we provide more trails, we are going to keep getting more new people into the sport.  Many times, new riders aren't going to read all the signs or research basic etiquette before riding.  So it is up to all of us to help educate other riders. 

The main message to get across is to slow down when encountering other trail users.  Even if they pull off the trail for you, just SLOW DOWN. 
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MWilliams

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Re: Yielding
« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2011, 01:13:20 PM »
If you are coming towards a hiker, and they step off the trail for you, you don't need to stop.  Slow down and thank them and ride right through.  Just know that if they were unable to step off the trail, that you would need to stop.  Once everyone is stopped, there is no requirement for the biker to stay stopped while the hiker goes by.  Its up to both people to work together to get by. 

As we provide more trails, we are going to keep getting more new people into the sport.  Many times, new riders aren't going to read all the signs or research basic etiquette before riding.  So it is up to all of us to help educate other riders. 

The main message to get across is to slow down when encountering other trail users.  Even if they pull off the trail for you, just SLOW DOWN.


Absolutely, right on & well put.
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Rcook

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Re: Yielding
« Reply #8 on: September 22, 2011, 04:57:09 PM »
So i went to BCSP tthis afternoon ridin GV and a doe was standin in the trail doing her best Paoul yield test impression and after a brief staring contest she let me pass remeber its there world were just playing in it.
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MWilliams

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Re: Yielding
« Reply #9 on: September 22, 2011, 05:35:01 PM »
Funny, I had two deers yield to me yesterday riding Shoen in the valley of bridges.
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Jeff Blum

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Re: Yielding
« Reply #10 on: September 22, 2011, 06:56:47 PM »
the valley of bridges.

OK, that one's not too bad.  I say we vote on it.

Doe

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Re: Yielding
« Reply #11 on: September 22, 2011, 07:48:18 PM »
I like it!

 

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