//Trail Status mouse over Java // Pedals

Author Topic: Pedals  (Read 8776 times)

BLOWNDFIZ

  • **
  • Posts: 109
    • View Profile
Re: Pedals
« Reply #15 on: July 06, 2011, 08:41:13 AM »
Now save up and get yourself a pair of 5-10 shoes and you will never think twice about going clipless.  For those who know me on this forum, they know how I feel about clipless pedals.

I've heard so many things about these shoes, are they really that good? A few have told me they are so grippy that you can actually pull up on BMX pedals with them? I ride clipless on the road but am not ready for that on the mountain bike for now.

Yes, 5-10's are pretty much unbelievable!!!  I ride clipless on my road bike and when I trail ride in Indiana, but when I go Downhill Riding I ride flats and 5-10's.  My first DH trip I bought some Vans and I thought they stuck very well to my flats.  This last trip to Snowshoe was my first time on 5-10's and they made the Vans feel like the bottoms were made of plastic....ok so it wasn't that dramatic, but you get my point ;D
Brandon
09 Santa Cruz Superlight
98 DBR V8 (down for repairs)
98 Specialized S-Works Team

Hugo

  • Training wheels on
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Pedals
« Reply #16 on: July 06, 2011, 10:45:11 AM »
Wellgos and 5-10's rock.

InTheWoods

  • Training wheels on
  • *
  • Posts: 42
  • RiDe HaRd . . . HaRdRoCk !
    • View Profile
Re: Pedals
« Reply #17 on: July 06, 2011, 04:50:16 PM »
I am loving the wellgo's . . . I have plenty of power.
What model of Five Tens?
I like to play in the woods . . . on my HardRock 29er

Ed Strobel

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 602
    • View Profile
Re: Pedals
« Reply #18 on: July 06, 2011, 05:52:21 PM »
Enforcer or one of the free ride models.
Check their web site for the variations.

Ed

Fett

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 1405
    • View Profile
Re: Pedals
« Reply #19 on: July 06, 2011, 08:31:36 PM »
If you are not racing and riding flats makes you want to ride your bike more, go for it. It is about having fun.

If you are racing, you are deluding yourself if you think that flats are anywhere near as efficient as being clipped in. The learning curve does suck a bit, but once you have it down, you generate quite a bit more power and efficiency.

Even in the BMX world, more and more riders are clipped in all the time.
Need a home mortgage?  Let me help.   Click here for more info: www.ruoff.com/jefffetterer

InTheWoods

  • Training wheels on
  • *
  • Posts: 42
  • RiDe HaRd . . . HaRdRoCk !
    • View Profile
Re: Pedals
« Reply #20 on: July 06, 2011, 08:40:05 PM »
No racing for me . . . it is all about fun. . . .    I can afford another shoulder surgery or any 5 -10 shoes :)
I like to play in the woods . . . on my HardRock 29er

Konarick

  • **
  • Posts: 107
    • View Profile
Re: Pedals
« Reply #21 on: July 06, 2011, 09:42:02 PM »
I have the Sam Hill's and love them.  I got them from Zappo's and that was the best price I could find, free shipping and free return, size is true, I wear a 10 and the 5-10's I got were 10's so true to size.  Don't fall for the hype that you have to go clipless to be a better rider.  We are not pro riders and we do not train 6-8 hrs a day to train to spin efficiently enough for clipless to make a difference.  Ride flats and enjoy.
Quit complaining and get out and ride.

rmknotts

  • **
  • Posts: 91
  • Ride like there is no tomorrow.
    • View Profile
Re: Pedals
« Reply #22 on: July 08, 2011, 10:23:39 AM »
"We are not pro riders and we do not train 6-8 hrs a day to train to spin efficiently enough for clipless to make a difference."

I completely disagree from a biomechanical standpoint. When not clipping in you lose power, a lot of power, weather your a pro rider or not. That is unless your doing downhill. When taking a peddle, not clipped in, all your power is from the down phase of your peddle. Thats all quad work and only 1/2 a peddle. The other 1/2 would be a loss of power and what I like to call "dead space", which makes you less efficient. Clipping in allows you to use a full range of motion, your quads and hamstrings which will make you much more efficient. Lets say we go down to Brown County. Going up those hills will be much harder unless you are clipped in. Clipping in allows you to use a "push/ pull" motion. Not clipping in only allows the "push" phase.
2013 Trek Superfly 100 AL Pro
2011 Trek Speedconcept 7.2
1985 Schwinn Sport

"I can ride my bicycle with no handlebars"

MikeVK

  • **
  • Posts: 65
    • View Profile
Re: Pedals
« Reply #23 on: July 08, 2011, 01:52:04 PM »
There have been several recent studies that question the benefit of clipless pedals in overall cycling performance.  I've linked to a mtbr review post with some of them.  The recent research suggests there is not nearly as a large a benefit to clipless pedals as I previously assumed.  While clipless allows a higher maximum output (the push/pull effect), they do not necessarily produce a more efficient pedal stroke. 

On a mountain bike where having the freedom to put a foot down quickly can prevent crashes there is a real cost/benefit question to clipless pedals.  Of course, I still love my egg beaters and ride with them all the time.  That being said, I'm considering a pair of 5-10's and some flats to see how different it feels.

http://forums.mtbr.com/showpost.php?p=7734735&postcount=64

InTheWoods

  • Training wheels on
  • *
  • Posts: 42
  • RiDe HaRd . . . HaRdRoCk !
    • View Profile
Re: Pedals
« Reply #24 on: July 08, 2011, 04:47:09 PM »
[Posted on: Today at 01:52:04 PM][/On a mountain bike where having the freedom to put a foot down quickly can prevent crashes there is a real cost/benefit question to clipless pedals]

That is the benefit for me . . . if the cost is power or speed that's is fine . . . I don't ride for time !
I like to play in the woods . . . on my HardRock 29er

Seth Hildebrand

  • **
  • Posts: 188
    • View Profile
Re: Pedals
« Reply #25 on: July 08, 2011, 05:38:38 PM »
I can remember as a kid (on my yellow banana seat Swinger) when sometimes my foot would slip and I'd either slid my shin over the pedal, or would make a surprising stop when my foot hit the ground in front of the pedal. This didn't happen a lot but more so when it was wet, muddy or when I was riding rough terrain. I can't imagine there are any riders who haven't experience this at least once in their early days of riding.

With clips, your foot stays on the pedal so you don't have this problem. Also, when my thighs are tired, I'll change my stroke so that my energy comes from the up-stroke which gives my thighs a rest and allows me to push harder.

Having said all that, I do wonder if I would run the corners a bit faster with the confidence that I could more easily put a foot down. But then I could also unclip prior to the turn when I know it has the potential for slipping,

InTheWoods

  • Training wheels on
  • *
  • Posts: 42
  • RiDe HaRd . . . HaRdRoCk !
    • View Profile
Re: Pedals
« Reply #26 on: July 08, 2011, 06:18:16 PM »
I can remember as a kid (on my yellow banana seat Swinger) when sometimes my foot would slip and I'd either slid my shin over the pedal, or would make a surprising stop when my foot hit the ground in front of the pedal. This didn't happen a lot but more so when it was wet, muddy or when I was riding rough terrain. I can't imagine there are any riders who haven't experience this at least once in their early days of riding.

I too remember those days . . growing up in the Adirondack Mountains of New York - Fun
I also remember crashing hard in the rocks of the California Desert ( clipped in eggbeaters ) or sliding down the side of at Mountain in Big Bear CA - Not fun

This is my 1st year back to Mountain Biking in like 5 years and this is Indiana where if it is muddy or wet we can't ride because the trails are closed !
I like to play in the woods . . . on my HardRock 29er

Ed Strobel

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 602
    • View Profile
Re: Pedals
« Reply #27 on: July 08, 2011, 07:01:42 PM »
The newer low-profile flats are distinctly different than the Shimano, Sun Ringle, and Kona flats of just a few years ago.
Also, the 5-10 shoes are vastly better than Chuck Taylors, running shoes, and even Vans.

I just rode a few days at Whistler on flats. One day in the pouring rain.
Nothing at BCSP is rougher or steeper for a given length of trail, and I had zero foot slippage.

Ed

Konarick

  • **
  • Posts: 107
    • View Profile
Re: Pedals
« Reply #28 on: July 08, 2011, 08:24:17 PM »
How about that, just a few short years ago I was alone on this issue of flats and 5-10 shoes, now I am hearing more about it and actually seeing more of them on the trail.  There are numerous studies out now that contest the whole issue of efficiency and power with clipless pedals.  Go to Better ride.com or look up James Wilson of MTB Strength and Training systems and look at the studies they have published and make your own decision.  What I think about is being on the Cliffside Trail at Versailles State Park and not being able to get unclipped, it is a long way down to the river.
Quit complaining and get out and ride.

Ed Strobel

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 602
    • View Profile
Re: Pedals
« Reply #29 on: July 08, 2011, 09:27:58 PM »
You weren't alone Konarick, well, except for the 5-10s. I usually had Vans.
Even if I didn't have them on the bike all of the time, I think aside from '88 to '90 I've had a set of flats. Starting with the then fairly new Shimano DX about 1980ish (the BMX days), then all of the clones that followed. Now I have a couple of different brands of the lower-profile flats, and feel they are even better.


Ed

 

Important Links

Join HMBA

 

Calendar

 

Trail Guide

 

Links