//Trail Status mouse over Java // Warrenty

Author Topic: Warrenty  (Read 2154 times)

Kirk Hilton

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Warrenty
« on: March 07, 2011, 11:07:16 AM »
I have a 2006 Platinum R7 Manitou fork.  I always serviced the fork myself.  This year I sent it to Suspension Experts in Asheville, NC.  They overhauled the fork got it back, went to go for a ride and the fork locked up solid.  Deflated both sides of the fork and it was still locked solid.  Sent the fork back to them, they said that there might be a slight plastic sliver that might of be causing the sticking.  They sent it back went to go for a ride on Sunday, same thing.  I set my sag at between 10 to 15 mm which is about 110psi.  I am 5'8, 180.

Think I should ask for money back, send it back or take it apart and look for the cause?   

joshuaprater

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Re: Warrenty
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2011, 10:35:56 PM »
If you touch it with a tool, warranty is void. I'd send it back in again with a more detailed description of the event (if that's possible) including temperatures, riding condition, any jumps you may have come across, etc. That way they'll have a better picture. When "they said that there might be a slight plastic sliver that might of be causing the sticking," what they meant is that they have no idea.

If I remember correctly, your negative "spv" valve or whatever they call it needs to be at least 40 or so psi. But, when you air up the negative valve it adds to your positive so start low. You might just put the same amount in both, given that you have a negative valve, I can't remember what that fork looks like... If the negative chamber is too low, it'll just stay locked up and will only un-lock with a big bump. Kinda like the X-series Fox forks with the inertia valve. Or the brain shock. It's really just an inertia valve. Pretty simple construction but has to be made with high tolerances and doesn't work when it wears out.

In that case, other idea I could offer is that the inertia valve is sticking. If the shaft it glides on is worn it will jam up making it feel like it'll never un-lock. In that case you'll need a new SPV damper for this fork. You have to test it on all sides since the shaft only wears on one side and you can't see it since the valve is in the way. At least that's what my brain is telling me. I haven't looked at one up close in like three years!

So if you take it apart, that's what I'd look for...


JP


joshuaprater

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Re: Warrenty
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2011, 10:59:32 PM »
OK, so I went and looked at this fork in the tubes, saw that it indeed has one of those inertia valves. They call it a "snap valve."

To test it,
1. take the air out of the positive chamber and fill the SPV up to about 50 psi.
2. Put your weight into the handlebar for like a minute. Don't get all ADD on it, wait an actual minute. It should slowly compress until it bottoms.

At that point you can release it. You might push down on the tire and pull up on the bar at the same time to make it move as quickly as possible when you remove your body weight. That might free up the inertia valve. Then, it might work for, like, 100'. Then it'll lock up again. I think you'll need a new one...

Kirk Hilton

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Re: Warrenty
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2011, 07:51:24 PM »
Suspension experts sent the fork to Manitou.  Manitou said that there was a problem with these fork, which was exactly what was causing it to lock.  Problem was it never locked before I sent it to Suspension Experts.  Anyway I am very grateful that Suspension Experts got me a 2011 R7 MRC for a 2006 R7 Platmum.

 

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