//Trail Status mouse over Java // tools to carry

Author Topic: tools to carry  (Read 3509 times)

Mahk

  • HMBA-IMBA Member
  • Should be riding....
  • *
  • Posts: 202
    • View Profile
tools to carry
« on: May 06, 2014, 10:19:15 AM »
I find myself carrying, or wanting to carry, more and more tools for maintenance / repair while on the trail.  A saddle bag used to be enough to carry things, but the more I ride the more things break and the more things I want to carry.  Any suggestions for what to use to carry the basic on-trail repair kit (tube, hex wrenches, pump, cartidges, links, hanger)?  Any tools, or spare parts, that I've omitted?
 
Thanks.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2014, 08:31:40 AM by Mahk »
CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNERô professional.  
More info: www.facebook.com/MarkAdamsCFP/

tony

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 528
    • View Profile
    • http://www.bgindy.com
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2014, 10:42:02 AM »
I find myself carrying, or wanting to carry, more and more tools for maintenance / repair while on the trail.  A saddle bag used to be enough to carry things, but the more I ride the more things break and the more things I want to carry.  Any suggestions for what to use to carry the basic on-trail repair kit (tube, hex wrenches, pump, cartidges, links, hanger)?  Any tools, or spare parts, that I've omitted?
 
Thanks.

What you have listed should cover what you need.  I'd get a nice multi-tool that has all the wrenches plus chain-tool and spoke wrenches. 

David Kuehnen

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 598
  • HMBA-IMBA member
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2014, 11:03:44 AM »
The best thing to do is inventory all the fasteners on the bike.  A lot of newer components (brakes especially) are using Torx (Star) bolts.   Then get a multi-tool that has those.

A tube is essential, even if you are tubeless ans although CO2 cartridges are quick to use, a pump is unlimited in the number of tires it can fill. 


Quick links and a chain breaker tool are also essential.


A really good thing to carry is a clean shop rag to lay you tools out on during a trail side repair job.
David Kuehnen, PE

2019

FHSP    - 16 hr
TRTP.     - 8 hr

ztbishop

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 218
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2014, 12:42:54 PM »

If I were riding local Indy trails, I would stop at the multi-tool or hanger in this list.
But my  overly-heavy over-filled pack has the following in order from important to...meh.


-Two tubes (running tubeless and I'm a bit O.C.D. about needing both).
If running tubes, I'd just take 1 spare
-PUMP (CO2 is faster, but you never know if you'll run out)
-Tire Levers (you may be able to use a quick-release in a pinch)
-Multi Tool with chain tool / spoke wrenches (just realized the hard way mine doesn't have the T30 bit required for chainring bolts, so I give the bike a good going over before trips)
-Power Link for broken chains
-Derailleur Hanger (there are universal emergency hangers available)
-A patch kit (keep in mind the glue can dry out once opened & stored)
-Tire boots (for torn sidewalls) - throw one in the patch kit
-phone
******
a bit over-kill below
******
-Zip-ties  (good for forcing a Single Speed setup if you break your derailleur)
-Emergency Spoke (Kevlar string with hook & nipple) - had to order these
-Snack
-I also have a razor wrapped in electrical tape...I don't know why.  Maybe I'll have to fight a bear off and tape its paws behind it's back...or for cutting said zip-ties above.
-First Aid pack?  (never carried one, but there were times I should have)
-Teensy bottle of chain-lube
-expandible rag (add water)
-single serving of chamois butter (do not eat)
-whistle (hey, you never know)


...so most people would probably stop at the multi-tool in this list.  I guess it depends on how far-off / adventurous you are getting.


Also, test the chain breaker if you have spare links...they can be difficult to get the right leverage with a multi-tool.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2014, 02:10:25 PM by ztbishop »

DeepVI

  • **
  • Posts: 157
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2014, 02:43:36 PM »

Hand full of good zipties.  They are light and can fix just about anything.
A good amount of duct tape wrapped around an old CO2 cartridge. 


With these two things plus a decent multi tool, you can get out of just about anything.


Now for the no one has.  A ladies monthly pad.  Yep, they weight nothing and can soak up a lot of blood(obviously).   Having put them to the field test, they work.  Tore open my elbow in a crash.  If I just had the standard band-aid, I'd had to have called the ride.  Rinsed out the gushing wound, slapped the Maxi Pad on, put a few wraps of tape around it and was good for the rest of the ride.


Best backcountry fix so far.
2012 Trek Scratch
2012 Transition TransAM
Keep the rubber side down!

Fett

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 1405
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2014, 02:52:27 PM »
Having the proper tools and gear is important.  Make sure your riding buddies come well prepared. ;D
Need a home mortgage?  Let me help.   Click here for more info: www.ruoff.com/jefffetterer

DeepVI

  • **
  • Posts: 157
    • View Profile
2012 Trek Scratch
2012 Transition TransAM
Keep the rubber side down!

Shark

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 814
  • I was already riding.....
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2014, 05:07:40 PM »
Not only bringing the tools, but the knowledge to use them!

Practice breaking & fixing an old chain at home so you're not stuck *learning" at the bottom of HP in the dark :)

I tend to bring lots of stuff, I hate hiking a bike out. Remember the toilet paper. Don't need it often, but there's always the chance lol. Good fire starter too as a backup.
Fat is where it's at!......Tires that is.
Moved to Idaho....:) Now I actually *mountain* bike.

Wall

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 346
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2014, 06:53:13 PM »
CO2 is essential if you run tubeless.  Try seating a bead with a small hand pump.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2014, 06:54:15 AM by Wall »

mtbikernate

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 648
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2014, 07:53:30 PM »
No need for CO2 if you have tubes.  CO2 is too limiting...I won't carry it on my mtb.  It stays on my commuter bike.


I carry:
Multitool
* Tire levers
* pump
* spare tube (yes, I'm rolling the dice for a double flat by only carrying one)
* glueless patch kit (glueless goes in the pack with me, the traditional ones with the glue stay at home)
* tire boot
* first aid kit (mostly absorbent bandages, but also med tape, moleskin, OTC meds - benadryl, ibuprofen, etc) - it is the most used item in my pack, and not for myself.  I've lost count of how many riders I've patched up on the trail.  Ranging from blisters and bee stings to concussions and broken noses.
* one or two energy gels in addition to the food I actually intend to eat on a ride


This is just for a single day ride up to about 30mi or so.  It all goes into a pack.  If I'm planning on being out longer - say, for a really long day ride, or an overnight, then I dip into my backpacking gear and cover more contingencies, as well as bringing more repair items.

grayhound

  • HMBA-IMBA Member
  • Training wheels on
  • *
  • Posts: 34
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2014, 09:43:47 PM »
Hey Mahk, I also carry a small leatherman's tool which has the plier and small blade tools.  Have used the pliers countless times, the blade not so often. If I'm carrying a small capacity camelback(50-70 oz.) for water or a bottle, I like carrying my tools in a small fanny pack, as it sits low on the hips and below my kit pockets, and stays below baggie shirts for air flow.  If I'm carrying a large capacity camelback(100 oz.), then I'll usually put the tools in the same pack.  Like to keep the bike as light as possible on trail riding but may use seatbag on long endurance rides for less stress on the body. 

mtbikernate

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 648
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #11 on: May 07, 2014, 11:20:54 AM »
Hey Mahk, I also carry a small leatherman's tool which has the plier and small blade tools.  Have used the pliers countless times, the blade not so often. If I'm carrying a small capacity camelback(50-70 oz.) for water or a bottle, I like carrying my tools in a small fanny pack, as it sits low on the hips and below my kit pockets, and stays below baggie shirts for air flow.  If I'm carrying a large capacity camelback(100 oz.), then I'll usually put the tools in the same pack.  Like to keep the bike as light as possible on trail riding but may use seatbag on long endurance rides for less stress on the body.


I forgot to mention that I have one of those in my pack, too.  The P4, I think it is.

Proscott

  • Training wheels on
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Trying to have fun without getting hurt.
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #12 on: May 07, 2014, 12:34:16 PM »
Do you ever use your tire pump? This is my first year riding and after a couple time out I quit carrying my pump. Too bulky. Same question for a chain tool. Is it used once a season? Or more often?  Thanks.


Ryan
Ryan S.
2012 Trek SuperFly

Fett

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 1405
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #13 on: May 07, 2014, 01:04:28 PM »
For me, it is usually CO2 and a multitool with a chainbreaker for BCSP Rides.  Realistically, my beads are so tight on my tubeless setup, there is no way that I am going to easily put a tube in on the trail. Stan's latex is good enough that, unless I rip a really big hole in the tire, it is going to seal up with a hit of CO2 enough to make it back to the car.
 
My pack for a Pisgah/Out West trip is an entirely different animal as you are out in the middle of nowhere and have to be self reliant or you could  be spending the night in the woods.  Examples of things in my pack that have saved my behind in recent times: extra derailleur cable, cleat bolts for shoes, duct tape, derailleur hanger, toe strap, water purifying tablets, Park tire boot, Benedryl, packable survival blanket, etc.
 
One thing that I normally do on all my bikes is tape a quick link onto the brake cable with electrical tape. It has helped myself or others several times.
Need a home mortgage?  Let me help.   Click here for more info: www.ruoff.com/jefffetterer

tony

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 528
    • View Profile
    • http://www.bgindy.com
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #14 on: May 07, 2014, 02:04:16 PM »
Do you ever use your tire pump? This is my first year riding and after a couple time out I quit carrying my pump. Too bulky. Same question for a chain tool. Is it used once a season? Or more often?  Thanks.


Ryan

I didn't carry my pump once back in 1994.  Wound up on a 5 mile hike.  Carried a pump ever since.

 

Important Links

Join HMBA

 

Calendar

 

Trail Guide

 

Links