//Trail Status mouse over Java // tools to carry

Author Topic: tools to carry  (Read 3513 times)

ztbishop

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 218
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #15 on: May 07, 2014, 02:07:44 PM »
I have a low-volume, high pressure pump that mounts next to my water bottle cage.   It takes a while compared to a high volume pump, but it's fairly light and small.  I have one mounted on each bike so I don't have to carry it in a pack.

mtbikernate

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 648
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #16 on: May 07, 2014, 03:45:39 PM »
Do you ever use your tire pump? This is my first year riding and after a couple time out I quit carrying my pump. Too bulky. Same question for a chain tool. Is it used once a season? Or more often?  Thanks.


Ryan

I didn't carry my pump once back in 1994.  Wound up on a 5 mile hike.  Carried a pump ever since.


I did not have a pump on my first trip to NC in about 2000.  6 mile hike for me, convinced me to carry tube, patches AND a pump on all future rides.


It doesn't get used often, but it is worth its weight on 100 rides if it only gets used once in that time.  I carry a Blackburn Mammoth Mtn.


I ride Continental tires on Mavic UST wheels.  It takes a little muscle, but I can remove them by hand.  I still carry tire levers just in case.

Mahk

  • HMBA-IMBA Member
  • Should be riding....
  • *
  • Posts: 202
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #17 on: May 08, 2014, 10:23:32 AM »
Do you ever use your tire pump? This is my first year riding and after a couple time out I quit carrying my pump. Too bulky. Same question for a chain tool. Is it used once a season? Or more often?  Thanks.


Ryan

This is my second summer riding.  At the beginning of last summer (my first summer riding), I didn't carry any tools.  I was new to biking and didn't think I would be doing anything aggressive enough to warrant carrying any tools. 
 
My first tires were tubed and one developed a slow leak at the valve stem.  A passing rider let me use their pump and I was able to ride back and repair the valve.  Sometime later the tire started to leak somewhere else and I ended up having to walk out to the car.  I went to tubeless, which I was told hardly ever had problems. A month or so later one of those developed a slow leak, but a passing rider provided a CO2 cartridge so I was able to finish the ride, and I then started using Stans (which is a latex fluid that coats the inside of the tire and self-seals small holes).  Sometime in August that tire wore out/blew out completely, and, although several riders sacrificed a couple of CO2 cartridges, another walk back to the car, and another new tire.  On my second ride this spring I went over a rough stream crossing and blew two holes in the (fairly) new tire.  A passing rider donated a CO2 cartridge, but the holes were too big and the tire deflated.  Several other riders offered tubes, but they all had 29" tubes and my tires are 26".  Another walk to the car.  Last night an experienced rider / mechanic pointed out that my front tire was worn and should be replaced with something more aggressive.  And my seat was bent. 
 
My kit will include pump, cartridge, and tube, if not for me, then to help out someone else as others have helped me.  Mtb'ers are great. 
 
And that's just the tires.....
« Last Edit: May 08, 2014, 10:27:26 AM by Mahk »
CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNERô professional.  
More info: www.facebook.com/MarkAdamsCFP/

Fett

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 1405
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #18 on: May 08, 2014, 10:28:25 AM »
29er tubes will work just fine on a 26 in a pinch.  They are just not an optimal size.
Need a home mortgage?  Let me help.   Click here for more info: www.ruoff.com/jefffetterer

Mahk

  • HMBA-IMBA Member
  • Should be riding....
  • *
  • Posts: 202
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #19 on: May 08, 2014, 12:01:43 PM »
Funny you phrased it that way.  The other riders thought that if they put the 29er tube in the smaller, 26" rim, the tube would fold on itself and the fold would pinch a hole. 
 
Good to know it will work. 
CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNERô professional.  
More info: www.facebook.com/MarkAdamsCFP/

Fett

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 1405
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #20 on: May 08, 2014, 12:16:54 PM »
Funny you phrased it that way.  The other riders thought that if they put the 29er tube in the smaller, 26" rim, the tube would fold on itself and the fold would pinch a hole. 
 
Good to know it will work.

It is certainly possible, but it would likely take a while.  I would take a chance to avoid a long walk home.
Need a home mortgage?  Let me help.   Click here for more info: www.ruoff.com/jefffetterer

Proscott

  • Training wheels on
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Trying to have fun without getting hurt.
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #21 on: May 09, 2014, 06:55:16 AM »
I appreciate all of the info. I was convinced at 5 mile walk.
On another note, I will say that I am very surprised at how friendly and helpful riders are. From giving gear away to constantly asking if everything is okay when I  am stopped, to just general friendliness. It sure makes for a better riding experience, especially for an insecure first time rider.


Ryan
Ryan S.
2012 Trek SuperFly

Mahk

  • HMBA-IMBA Member
  • Should be riding....
  • *
  • Posts: 202
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry and how
« Reply #22 on: May 09, 2014, 08:30:46 AM »
Thanks for all the suggestions.  A couple of people mentioned a 'boot'.  What is that? 
 
Fett you mentioned a toe strap, which makes me think of pedals with toe clips (cages).  Is that what you meant? 
 
One thing that wasn't mentioned here is a pair of reading glasses.   I know one rider who carries them and they make it much easier to work on those little mechanical things. 
« Last Edit: May 09, 2014, 08:54:30 AM by Mahk »
CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNERô professional.  
More info: www.facebook.com/MarkAdamsCFP/

Fett

  • Should be riding....
  • ***
  • Posts: 1405
    • View Profile
Re: tools to carry
« Reply #23 on: May 09, 2014, 03:35:09 PM »
A boot is piece of thin flexible plastic a little bit smaller than a credit card. Park makes them. A folded up dollar bill also works in a pinch.  If you ever cut a sidewall, stick it inside the tire, so the tube does not bulge out, when you fill the tire back up with air.
 
Yes, a toe strap is jsut what you think it is, the strap from an old toe clip.  It is handy to have around, when sometimes a zip tie doesnt fit the bill.
Need a home mortgage?  Let me help.   Click here for more info: www.ruoff.com/jefffetterer

 

Important Links

Join HMBA

 

Calendar

 

Trail Guide

 

Links